Category Archives: ANIMAL & ENVIRONMENTAL SCANNING

SA HUNTER CRUSHED TO DEATH BY ELEPHANT DURING HUNT IN ZIMBABWE

Theunis Botha was leading a hunt when they stumbled across a herd of elephants on Friday.

Theunis Botha. Picture: facebook.com

 

CAPE TOWN – Reports from Eye Witness News has it that a Johannesburg hunter has been crushed to death by an elephant in Zimbabwe.

Theunis Botha was leading a hunt when they stumbled across a herd of elephants on Friday.

It’s understood that three elephants approached the hunters and Botha opened fire, prompting a fourth elephant to lift him up with her trunk.

According to Netwerk24, another member of the group fired a fatal shot at the elephant, who fell on Botha.

His company website (Game Hounds Safaris) says he perfected leopard and lion hunting safaris with hounds in Africa.

Botha is survived by his wife and five children.

EMERGENCY: ZILLE OFFICIALLY DECLARES WESTERN CAPE A DISASTER ZONE AS ‘DAY ZERO’ APPROACHES

The disaster will be classified for a three-month period which can be extended if the need arises.

The City of Cape Town tweeted this image of Faure Reservoir after a pilot was launched to help lower water use. Picture: @CityofCT on Twitter

Western Cape Premier Helen Zille on Monday officially declared the Western Cape a disaster area in response to the current drought crisis – the worst in more than a century.

“The disaster declaration will accelerate the Western Cape Disaster Management Centre’s Project ‘Avoiding Day Read more

CITY OF CAPE TOWN ALLOCATES ANOTHER R22M FOR EXTRA STAFF AMID WATER CRISES

The municipality and provincial government are scrambling to mitigate the impact of the drought with dam levels having plummeted even further.

FILE: Water runs from a tap. Picture: Reinart Toerien/EWN.

CAPE TOWN – The City of Cape Town has allocated R22 million to employ additional staff to attend to water-related faults and complaints.

The municipality and provincial government are scrambling to mitigate the impact of the drought with dam levels having plummeted even Read more

CLIMATE CHANGE FORCING ANTARCTIC TO BE GREENER IN A BAD WAY – SCIENTISTS

Plant life on Antarctica is growing rapidly because of climate change, scientists have found.

Few plants live on the continent but scientists studying moss have found a sharp increase in biological activity in the last 50 years.

Scientists used moss bank cores – which are well preserved in Antarctica’s cold conditions – from an area spanning about Read more

KRUGER NATIONAL PARK WARNS TOURISTS ABOUT MALARIA OUTBREAK

The warning comes in the wake of an outbreak of the disease that claimed over 30 lives in neighbouring Limpopo.

USDA/AFP/File / Ho<br />Malaria, the mosquito-borne disease kills some 584,000 people per year -- more than 75 percent of them children under five, according to the WHO

CAPE TOWN – The Kruger National Park in Mpumalanga has urged visitors to take precautionary measures against Malaria before visiting.

The warning comes in the wake of an outbreak of the disease that claimed over 30 lives in neighbouring Limpopo.

The SA National Parks (SANParks) said the park was classified as a low-risk area although it was situated in a malaria area.

“Due to the heavy rainfall this year, there are pools of water in abundance everywhere and the Park is experiencing Malaria cases especially in the northern part of the Park,” said spokesperson William Mabasa.

“Malaria seems to be on the brink of an outbreak lately despite the fact that we almost in winter now with some of the country’s provinces reporting hundreds of people who have been admitted and tested positive for the disease in hospitals.

“We therefore would like to advise visitors to take the necessary precautions which include the use of prophylaxis and vaccinations in consultation with their doctors to prevent the possibility of contracting Malaria, as Kruger National Park is known to be one of the Malaria endemic areas in this country.”

The northern part of South Africa is prone to malaria cases, although at minimal levels.

Despite the health department’s routine spraying of households between September and March to combat the disease, this year’s outbreak caught authorities by surprise and has so far claimed over 30 lives.

“Although malaria can be contracted at any time of the year, the malaria season in this country is October to April, with March and April the highest risk period. However, this year seems to be slightly different,” said Mabasa.

“With winter approaching, mosquitoes which are carriers of the parasite causing malaria, should begin to hibernate and the situation shall possibly improve.

“There are medical doctors permanently based in Skukuza, Kruger National Park’s main camp. The public can also consult them for information and advice prior to their visit to the park.”

The provincial health department said it had response teams spread across the northern part of Limpopo to deal with malaria cases.

Malaria is transmitted through a mosquito bite and causes death if untreated.

-The Citizen

PHOTO: USDA/AFP/File / Ho
Malaria, the mosquito-borne disease kills some 584,000 people per year — more than 75 percent of them children under five, according to the WHO

GET READY FOR A DRY WINTER – CITY OF CAPE TOWN OFFICIAL WARNS

Dam levels are critically low and the municipality is to further heighten water restrictions from next month.

FILE: The Theewaterskloof Dam near Cape Town. Picture: EWN.

CAPE TOWN – A City of Cape Town official has warned that this winter could be as dry as the previous two.

Gisela Kaiser issued the warning this week at the Africa Utility Week Conference in Cape Town.

Dam levels are critically low and the municipality is to further heighten water restrictions from next month.

Meanwhile, the owners of a local laundry chain have expressed concern over the looming tighter restrictions and the worsening crisis.

Dry Cleaning 4U’s owner Andries Venter says they realise the importance of saving water but fear the growth of the business will be impacted if the situation persists.

The business, which employs 30 people, runs outlets in Okovango Crossing, Durbanville and Plattekloof.

Venter says they will have to re-apply for an exemption if Level 4 restrictions are adopted and come into effect next month.

“I’m very concerned… not just for my business but if we have less than 10% of water in the dams, water will start to be muddy, as I understand, and then we’ll grapple with the quality of the water.”

The City of Cape Town says it will arrange specific regulations with businesses to minimise the impact.

-Eye Witness News

PHOTO: The Theewaterskloof Dam near Cape Town. Picture: EWN.

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